“K√ľnstler’s report, and those we are receiving from the polizei, confirm what we had heard. This young man Weber, for whatever reason, has become untethered from the universal laws of gravitation.” General Friedmann of the Reichswehr laid a stack of freshly developed photos, newspaper clippings, and even a roll of newsreel film on the table.

The various foreigners of the Military Inter-Allied Commission of Control examined them curiously. “An artifact, no doubt, of your late Kaiser and his experiments with chemical warfare,” sniffed the French representative.

“How can we be sure these haven’t been faked?” replied his British counterpart. “That this isn’t some fresh treachery, as when you Bosches sank your own skips at Scapa to keep them out of our hands?”

“Imagine the potential, if accurate, to be weaponized,” whistled the Italian. “A whole squadron of troops untethered…why, for them, the Alps would be no barrier at all!” The American and Japanese council members mumbled in support.

“All of you, listen!” Ordinarily the Council could not be swayed by Friedmann’s words, but this time they all turned to acknowledge him. “The Reds are actively seeking him as we speak.”

This observation silenced all at the table. Much as the august military figures desired any such power for themselves, they wished it denied those they viewed as their implacable enemies.

“What,” said the Frenchman icily, “is to be done about that? Do you need troops?”

“The last thing we need is more of your troops, making another grab for land and spoils,” growled the Italian.

“We have the troops. Brave men, highly trained and well-equipped veterans.” Friedmann paused for the Allies to grouse about his troops having been trained in the slaughter of their countrymen, but they were silent. “I must ask you permission to deploy the Reichswehr in full force. Police and paramilitaries have failed.”

Silence.

“If you wish this aberration Weber and his power falling into the Reds’ hands, of moving east where you’ve no more ability to follow than I, by all means remain silent,” said the General. “I have full authorization from the Reichspr√§sident to act, but unless you give me the tools to do so, measures will fail as they have already.”

“You have your authorization, sir,” said the British representative quietly. The others nodded. “Use whatever measures you feel prudent so long as your men are back in their barracks by the first of the month.”

Friedmann nodded graciously and handed a pre-written telegram to his adjutant: DEPLOY REICHSWEHR TO ZONE OF INTEREST STOP ELIMINATE ANOMALY AND ANY RED SYMPATHIZERS STOP ANY AND ALL MEANS AUTHORIZED STOP.

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